On the GO

News, updates and tips for promoting Boulder’s transportation options.

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Dogs are Path Users, Too

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What lucky dogs we all are! It’s great to have a connected network of multi-use paths running throughout Boulder. Even better, our dogs can join us on most of these pathways. But remember, whether a path user has two feet or four paws, we all need to follow the rules to keep the path environment safe. Since your pooches are not able to read the rules, it means you need to take responsibility for their actions on the path. This is not only for the safety of two-footed users, but also for the safety of our furry friends.

Before you set out on one of Boulder’s multi-use paths, know the dog-related rules of that particular path. Some multi-use paths do not allow dogs and most that do require your dog to be on leash.  Some of us like to use nice, long, extendable leashes. They give our dogs freedom and help us avoid wrestling with tangled leashes. But these leashes can be dangerous, especially along multi-use paths shared by bicyclists. It is important to be aware of where other users are on the path and to retract your pup’s leash when approaching them. After all, you don’t want to “clothesline” other users with a nearly-invisible leash stretched across the path.  As a rule of thumb, guide your dog to be on the same side of the path as you, and to stay on the outer edge of the path.  This way, your dog has closer access to grassy areas.  You as a pet guardian also will also create a buffer between other users, including two unfamiliar dogs passing each other.  At night, consider attaching a light to your dog’s collar to help make him or her more visible. 

There are some City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Park trails that you can enjoy with your dogs off leash if you have a green “Voice and Sight Tag” and your dogs are under “Voice and Sight”control . Even on these trails, dogs must be on leash at the trailhead.  Be aware of trail junctions and trail signage. There are several trails that allow voice and sight command, but then change to a leashed trail along the way. Remember, you and your dogs are not only sharing the multi-use trails with walkers, hikers and bicyclists, you are also sharing the area with wildlife. If even your usually well-behaved dog is not following voice and sight rules, give them a break by leashing them for a while. It is important that we respect the needs of each path user and keep wildlife protected. To learn more about how to enroll in the city’s Voice and Sight Program, visit the Open Space and Mountain Parks web site.

Whether you are on a paved path in town or a soft-surface trail on Boulder’s open space lands, it is always your responsibility to clean up after your dog. This means coming prepared with your own poop bags at the ready, scooping the poop immediately, and depositing full bags in the trash, rather than leaving them on the side of the trail to be retrieved later. There is no poop fairy to pick up after you, and leaving your bags on the side of the trail is considered littering.

On or off a leash, please keep an eye on your dogs and be aware of how other people may feel about dogs. This means focusing on your pooch while enjoying Boulder’s open spaces and being attentive to your dog’s behaviors. Remember, while you may know that your dog is nice, some people may be afraid of or allergic to dogs. If someone doesn’t want to interact with your dog, you should respect that. It is your responsibility to keep your dog away from them. And since not all dogs get along, be respectful if someone doesn’t want your dog to approach theirs, no matter how friendly your dog is. If another dog is on a leash, you should have your dog pass by unless given permission for the dogs to meet. Keep in mind, their dog is on a leash for a reason.

With a little bit of extra awareness and courtesy, we can all go The Way of the Path together to enjoy our local resources.

Take the fourth weekly survey for your chance to win a $25 Downtown Boulder gift card! This will also be enter you into a drawing for the Way of the Path grand prize, a Timbuk2 Prospect Laptop Backpack (estimated retail value $150)

Last week’s gift card winner was Mary Jo R.congratulations! 

Check back here each week to read the new blog post and answer the weekly survey!

City of Boulder – Way of the Path 

Andy Malkiel owns Alley’s Dog Bowl, a healthy pet supply story in North Boulder, and has been using Boulder’s open spaces and multi-use paths since 1982. He is a former board member of FIDOS, a local organization that advocates for responsible recreational access for your dogs on our public lands managed by the City of Boulder. While part of a Community Group Forum in the early 2000s, Andy’s came up with the idea of a licensed educational program for off-leash dogs, which became the Voice and Sight Tag Program. He is the proud guardian of three happy voice and sight-controlled Chinooks.

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Speed Limit. 15 mph

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Common Courtesy. Priceless

By Ben Delaney, US Editor in Chief of BikeRadar

Do you know how fast you go on Boulder’s multi-use paths? Sometimes it’s hard to gauge, isn’t it?

When we drive a car, the speed limit is clear. We have our instruments to tell us if we’re within the limit, and our fellow travelers are mostly other automobiles traveling at a similar speed. However, on the multi-use paths, we are traveling with many different types of users, all moving at different speeds, and we each need to gauge our own speed, often without a speedometer.

How do we do this? It starts with common sense and basic courtesy. The speed limit on Boulder’s multi-use paths is 15 mph, unless posted otherwise, but traffic, sight distance and variable path conditions need to be considered. Ask yourself these questions: “Can I stop in the distance that I can see in front of me?” and “Is there anything that would hinder my ability to stop safely?” If you are unsure of your ability to stop or adjust quickly, slow down!

Research on conflicts associated with cyclists and pedestrians has identified the speed differential of these activities as a fundamental source. If you are a cyclist or skateboarder on a multi-use path, it is your obligation to yield to all other, slower users.

If you have a cyclometer on your bike, you can easily check your speed. Mobile phone apps are also available to provide this technology at our fingertips. (Check out a few here). If you use your phone, consider getting a handlebar mount. I recently crashed while holding a phone using Google Maps to navigate. With or without a gadget to measure your speed, you need to be aware of the world around you.

You can also gauge your speed in relation to people on foot. An average walker travels 3-4 mph and the average runner about 8-12 mph. If you are flying past runners, you’re going too fast. Boulder’s multi-use paths are a great resource for a lot of activities, but they are not the place to do speed workouts on your bike. It’s easy to get going too fast on downhills, too, even when coasting. I will often ride uphill on multi-use paths, such as up Boulder Creek, then will hop on the road with its painted bike lane for the downhill trip. It’s ok to get creative in the name of safety!

Ben Delaney is the US editor-in-chief of BikeRadar, the world’s largest site for bike reviews and gear news. Delaney has been writing about bikes for two decades, covering everything from manufacturing in China to the Tour de France. The former editor-in-chief of VeloNews magazine, Delaney rides Boulder multi-use paths nearly every day, often with his kids.

 

Take the third weekly survey The third weekly prize has already been randomly drawn. Please still complete the survey for an entry to win the grand prize!.

Last week’s gift card winner was Becca H.congratulations! 

Check back here each week to read the new blog post and answer the weekly survey!

City of Boulder – Way of the Path

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Flow with The Way of the Path

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Keep Right. Pass Left.

Did you know that on most multi-use paths in Boulder, you can use both sides of the path? All paths can accommodate two-way traffic.  So, it’s best to keep right and it’s a must when there is oncoming traffic.  But, only in locations where sight distance is limited, like approaches and underpasses, are the paths marked with a yellow line to designate traffic flow. With such freedom, we can travel side by side with a friend, or pass slower traffic as needed.  It also means that we have a responsibility to pay attention, be aware of our surroundings, and adjust our actions accordingly. 

For wheeled and foot traffic to flow smoothly and safely on the path, we all need to work together as a cooperative community. We know how it feels when the basic rules are not followed— like when the path is blocked by a group of people, or people pass unpredictably as they move through traffic.

Be mindful of the amount and types of other users on the paths.  When you are walking, stay to the right side of the path and make room for bicyclists and runners coming from behind wanting to pass.  When you are biking, keep right except to pass slower users. When you pass, let people around you know what you are doing so they are not surprised. And, when you do make changes in direction or speed of travel, let your fellow travelers know by voice, bell or hand gestures to give them plenty of time to react to your move. Likewise, be aware of high-congestion areas on the path and be prepared to navigate the traffic in cooperation with other users.

Because our multi-use paths are mostly separate from car traffic, they create a certain sense of safety. For some people this separation from car traffic means they let down their guard or act unpredictably. But, just because we are recreating or commuting with other walkers, skaters and cyclists, does not mean we can stop paying attention. In fact, it’s just the opposite. Remember, we are all moving at different speeds and going in different directions. Army Ants have been described as the world’s best commuters. Why? Because they communicate and cooperate as a community. The result is that their traffic flows almost without a hitch. We can certainly learn a lot from these ants.

Take time to think about what you can do on the path to communicate better with your fellow users. Working cooperatively with each other improves everyone’s experience on the path.

Take the second weekly survey The second weekly prize has already been randomly drawn. Please still complete the survey for an entry to win the grand prize!

 Last week’s gift card winner was Randall K., congratulations! 

Check back here each week to read the new blog post and answer the weekly survey!

City of Boulder – Way of the Path

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Be Part of The Way of The Path

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Whether you are a walker, runner, skater or cyclist, we all enjoy Boulder’s multi-use path system. It is a central part of our community. We use it for reasons from recreation to commuting to exercise. With such a diverse group of people using the paths, there’s bound to be a lot going on along each route.

So how do we all keep traffic moving safely and smoothly? It’s simple. By pledging to be a part of The Way of The Path.

The Way of The Path is a series of eight rules designed to encourage proper etiquette and safety for all path users. If everyone pledged to follow the eight rules, the flow and safety of the path would certainly improve. So do your part and pledge!

If you haven’t already pledged, just see one of our ambassadors at the Wednesday Boulder Farmers Markets, Boulder Creek Hometown Festival, Boulder Green Streets, or just along the one of our multi-use paths, like the Boulder Creek Path. Pledging is simple—all you have to do is provide us with your email address and then sign the banner! Ambassadors are also happy to answer any questions you may have about path rules.

Each week on the blog, we’ll discuss a different one of the rules. After reading, you‘ll have an opportunity to answer a question about that week’s rule and be entered to win a $25 Downtown Boulder, Inc. gift card. This will also earn you one entry into the grand prize drawing for a Timbuk2 Way of the Path Custom Prospect Laptop Backpack (estimated retail value $150). The grand prize will be awarded on Nov. 14, 2014. 

Take the first weekly survey now! The first weekly prize has already been randomly drawn. Please still complete the survey for an entry to win the grand prize!

In the mean time, we’ll see you on the path.

City of Boulder – Way of the Path

View the official rules for the Way of the Path Pledge Sweepstakes

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City of Boulder E-Bike Pilot Project 
On Feb. 7, 2014 the City of Boulder launched a pilot project to test the use of electric-assisted bicycles (E-Bikes) on off-street multi-use paths, not including paths on Open Space and Mountain Park lands. The objective of the pilot project is to determine whether e-bike users can coexist with other users on Boulder’s multi-use paths. 
 Information on the pilot project, including project background, project evaluation, and a map of multi-uses paths that allow the use of E-bikes, can be found at www.BoulderTMP.net click the link ‘Electric Bikes Policy Review’.
The city wants to hear about your personal experience with E-bikes on Boulder’s multi-use paths and is encouraging everyone to share their feedback on www.InspireBoulder.com

City of Boulder E-Bike Pilot Project

On Feb. 7, 2014 the City of Boulder launched a pilot project to test the use of electric-assisted bicycles (E-Bikes) on off-street multi-use paths, not including paths on Open Space and Mountain Park lands. The objective of the pilot project is to determine whether e-bike users can coexist with other users on Boulder’s multi-use paths.

 Information on the pilot project, including project background, project evaluation, and a map of multi-uses paths that allow the use of E-bikes, can be found at www.BoulderTMP.net click the link ‘Electric Bikes Policy Review’.

The city wants to hear about your personal experience with E-bikes on Boulder’s multi-use paths and is encouraging everyone to share their feedback on www.InspireBoulder.com

Filed under ebikes Ebikesboulder boulder

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Please Join Us! At the event, attendees will have the opportunity to give feedback on potential Transit Scenarios and Bike Living Laboratory Projects.

Please Join Us! At the event, attendees will have the opportunity to give feedback on potential Transit Scenarios and Bike Living Laboratory Projects.

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Designing a Renewed Vision for Transit in Boulder

 
The City launched a Design Your Transit System tool in early May, to get community feedback on how they would improve Boulder’s Transit System. Over 1,000 community members participated in the tool and here’s what they had to say…
 
Top 3 Priorities for participants:
  • Real Time Arrival
  • Expanded ECO Pass
  • Enhanced Regional Service 
Not far behind Enhanced regional service were Increased Bike Capacity on Transit, Free On board WiFi, and Enhanced Local Service.
 
Bottom 3 Priorities for participants:
  • Bike Center
  • B-Cycle Expansion
  • Increase Car Share Program 
If you haven’t shared your ideas yet, don’t worry there’s still time!
Visit www.BoulderTransitDesign.com to design your ideal transit system.

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2013 Complete Streets Living Laboratory

 
The city is rolling out a ‘Living Laboratory’ to test new bike facilities and see if they are right for Boulder. The Living Laboratory demonstration projects offer a real world environment for community members to test and report their results to the city. City is encouraging everyone to get out and ride these new treatments and report your results on InspireBoulder.com
 
Living Laboratory Demonstration Projects Include:
Back-in angled parking (University Avenue Broadway -17th Street)
Installation scheduled for August 12, 2013
Buffered Bike Lanes
University Avenue installation scheduled for August 12, 2013
Spruce Street installation scheduled for September 9, 2013
Protected Cycle Tracks
Baseline installation scheduled for August 12, 2013
University Avenue installation scheduled for spring/summer 2014
Advisory Bike Lane (Harvard Lane)
Installation scheduled for September 2013
A Bike Box (Intersection of Folsom and Canyon south bound)
Installation scheduled for September 2013
A Bike Boulevard (13th Street Balsam to north of Cedar Avenue)
Installation scheduled for September 2013
 
Potential changes to regulations regarding electric-assist bicycle use on multi-use paths and development related bike parking are also being considered. Council will consider the pilot ordinance in October
For more details on the Living Laboratory Demonstration Projects, visit www.BoulderTMP.net .

Filed under bike path bike friendly Boulder active Bike to Work Day bike sharing

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Arapahoe Avenue (Folsom to 15th streets) reduced to one eastbound lane of traffic this summer
Traffic impacts will be significant, including full-time lane closures. From Monday, June 3, through mid-August 2013, Arapahoe Avenue will be reduced to one eastbound lane of traffic between Folsom and 15th streets. Westbound traffic and both directions of the JUMP bus will be detoured onto Canyon Boulevard. During the Arapahoe Avenue Reconstruction, travelers are encouraged to bike or walk along the Boulder Creek Path, ride buses, or use Canyon Boulevard and the downtown parking garages if driving.

Filed under arapahoe avenue construction boulder driving traffic lane closures cone zones Boulder Creek detours summer

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RTD Bus Services Changes Proposed for August 2013

Three times a year, RTD makes service changes to the bus system to meet the diverse travel needs of the communities it serves. Several Boulder routes may be affected as part of the August 2013 service changes.

Boulder Bus Routes With Proposed Service Changes
204, 206, 208, 209, 225, 228, BOUND, DASH, JUMP, SKIP 

These changes are not final and are subject to review and feedback from the public and approval of the RTD Board of Directors. 

Please plan to attend one of the RTD public meetings scheduled between June 10 and 17. These meetings are designed to inform the public of the proposed changes and obtain input that will be summarized and reported to the RTD Board of Directors.

To view all of the proposed service changes and public meeting schedule, please visit rtd-denver.com.

Attendance at public meetings is not required to comment. You may fax your comments to 303-299-2227, email service.changes@rtd-denver.com, or fill out RTD’s online customer comment form by June 17, 2013.

Filed under rtd bus services changes boulder denver buses transit

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Create your own custom vision for transit in Boulder! The Design Your Transit tool (LINK BELOW) lets you prioritize investments such as service, fares, access and connections, amenities, and many more. So get to it … design YOUR ideal transit system. Your response and participation will inform the city’s 2013 Transportation Master Plan Update.
http://bouldertransitdesign.com/

Create your own custom vision for transit in Boulder! The Design Your Transit tool (LINK BELOW) lets you prioritize investments such as service, fares, access and connections, amenities, and many more. So get to it … design YOUR ideal transit system. Your response and participation will inform the city’s 2013 Transportation Master Plan Update.

http://bouldertransitdesign.com/

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Table Mesa Pedestrian Bridge Opens April 28

RTD’s FasTracks program achieves another milestone with the opening of the Table Mesa pedestrian bridge, bus slip ramp and other elements on Sunday, April 28. A celebratory ceremony will take place at the Table Mesa Park-n-Ride on Friday, May 3, at 10 a.m. on top of the parking garage.  

The new bus slip ramp and pedestrian bridge will allow commuters to safely cross over US 36, and is estimated to save Denver-bound transit riders three to five minutes of travel time. The bridge and slip ramp are an integral part of the US 36 Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project. 

For more information about the completion of the bridge and bus slip ramp, visit www.rtd-fastracks.com/us36_14.

Filed under rtd FasTracks pedestrian bridge milestone ceremony celebration bus table mesa drive commuters boulder denver transit US 36 us 36 express lanes bus rapid transit

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The City of Boulder needs YOUR face!
We’re collecting portraits of Boulderites, past and present, to include on the decorative glass panels in the new bus stop shelter at southbound Broadway and 16th Street/Euclid Avenue. The Carnegie Branch Library for Local History is supplying numerous historic photographs, but portraits of current Boulder residents are also needed!Please come have your picture taken at any of the three available dates and locations to participate in this community art project! • The Boulder Farmers’ Market, 13th Street between Arapahoe Avenue and Canyon Boulevard, on Saturday, April 20, from 9 a.m. to noon.• The bridge inside the Main Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., on Monday, April 22, from 4 to 7 p.m.• The southbound Broadway bus stop at 16th Street/Euclid Avenue on Thursday, April 25, from 4 to 7 p.m. If there is inclement weather, this site will be moved to the bridge inside the Main Boulder Public Library.For more information about the community art project, contact Noreen Walsh at walshn@bouldercolorado.gov.

The City of Boulder needs YOUR face!

We’re collecting portraits of Boulderites, past and present, to include on the decorative glass panels in the new bus stop shelter at southbound Broadway and 16th Street/Euclid Avenue. The Carnegie Branch Library for Local History is supplying numerous historic photographs, but portraits of current Boulder residents are also needed!

Please come have your picture taken at any of the three available dates and locations to participate in this community art project! 

• The Boulder Farmers’ Market, 13th Street between Arapahoe Avenue and Canyon Boulevard, on Saturday, April 20, from 9 a.m. to noon.
• The bridge inside the Main Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., on Monday, April 22, from 4 to 7 p.m.
• The southbound Broadway bus stop at 16th Street/Euclid Avenue on Thursday, April 25, from 4 to 7 p.m. If there is inclement weather, this site will be moved to the bridge inside the Main Boulder Public Library.

For more information about the community art project, contact Noreen Walsh at walshn@bouldercolorado.gov.

Filed under boulder Broadway boulder farmers market farmers market photography community art public art design Portrait History bus rtd boulder public library faces